Olson Tough!

 

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Bruce Hubble Bruce Hubble 4 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #1960
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    The Olson 30 is a tough boat. It has some very light components here and there, but structure takes care of that very nicely. I’m pleasantly surprised how good of condition the boat is.

    Spar Wars is a 1983 #212. It is currently going through a complete paint job, in and out. AND the big subject…a cockpit remodel. Yeah..the OD people are cringing, but when all is done..it will weigh the same and the hull shape is the same. I doubt a rejection of an entry fee would occur. Plus..I’m an inboard, so I’m mostly PHRF/ORR anyway.

    Observations on construction and condition after 30 years of abuse:

    1. A well built boat. Except for where the hatch cover wore through the deck, I have a dry deck! Inspect your hatch!!! You will have to remove it to check. I’ll be putting some sort of deck protection for the hatch to slide on. 1/8th inch should do it.

    2. Toe rails absolutely do not hold the boat together or contribute to stiffness. It is glued and overlapped at the joint. I found two places where the deck joint had partially parted…both at the low point at max beam. (Just below the front window) Theory: this would be where freezing water would have puddled on the toe rail. Seepage under the toe rail and into the joint probably lifted the joint with freezing action. It is just too much of a coincidence at the same spot on both sides. There is no lifting fore or aft of this 6 to 8″ area. No signs of stress either. Didn’t even crack the interior glass. I’m removing toe rails aft of the chain plates, convinced they add zero to integrity of the hull. They are required for ORR to that point, so good enough for me. None of my toe rail screw/bolts were tight enough to contribute structure. They were barely beyond finger tight. That is convincing me the glue holds the boat. (actually polyester resin with fillers bond the deck/hull seam) If you live in a freezing, outdoor storage place…you should consider removing the toe rails for an inspection mid ship. You would try to lift the deck with a flexible metal scraper at that point I mentioned. If it goes in with a tap or two of a hammer..time to get some epoxy in there. You should probably fiberglass the deck seam to seal out water while you are at it. No sillycone! Water weeps under silicone. Only the screws need sealer. It is all glass at the joint.

    3. I do not use jock straps or BOD. I do not have cabinet tab issues. I do have a turnbuckle from the deck to the front of the mast down below. This is evidently strong enough to prevent chain plates moving inward under load. It is working..what can I say?

    4. Chain plates at the deck. Measure yours. I found a 1/4″ difference to the edge of the hull. Doesn’t mean much..but info! No signs of movement, so it was built that way.

    5. Measure to see if your mast opening is in the center of the boat. I found a 1/2″ difference!!!!! I will be wedging the mast to starboard.

    6. Chainplates to the stem. 1/8th difference is not much..but you need to measure.

    7. Cockpit: structurally it is strong, but if we worry about backstay folding the boat..this would be the weak point: under the ladder. The cabin top is relying on the seats for ‘elevation’. One more bulkhead under the front of the pit would have made a big difference in stiffness. I’m an inboard..maybe the outboard has support there? I have an engine. My new cockpit has foam core on all surfaces. Stock: floor/seats only.

    8. The teak toe rail forward of the mast is going to disappear. The jib track is moving to that position and being shortened. I see no need for both as the track IS a toe rail. The teak part..just another place to leak. Plus, I think the track was too far inboard.

    9. Check your forepeak bolts. Mine were loose..didn’t know it because the bow pulpit was keeping it centered.

    For now..that is all I have. Thought it was worthwhile to document what I’ve found.

    #3273
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    6 to 8 INCH..not foot (separated deck area)

    #3283

    Jason Adamson
    Participant

    Thanks Bruce, I am envious of you project. Opening up the cockpit has been a thought in my mind for awhile. I’ve sailed on other boats, H33 and SC50, that have done this and it makes the boat feel so much bigger. I look forward to seeing pictures and status updates on your progress.

    #3285

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Hey Bruce,
    your boat is coming along really nice! Congratulations!

    #3289
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant
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