What Sails are these?

 

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Jean Andre 3 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #1957

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Hi all,

    along with my boat came a couple of unmarked sails that I am not sure what they would be.

    One measures: 28ft6in luff and 10ft foot, has batten pockets and a hand written marking “mega” on all three corners.

    The other measures: 35ft luff and 17ft foot.

    One other question, what determine an Olson´s sail number and how do I read an Olson HIN?

    Thank you, have a great weekend

    J

    #3252

    Jonathan Nye
    Participant

    Sounds like the first sail is a #4 (or smaller?) in that it’s around 9′ short of max hoist and the foot is just under 2 feet less than J. The second sail looks like a #2 – almost full hoist with just over 5′ of overlap aft of the mast.

    If I recall correctly, the 6th, 7th and 8th digits of the HIN correspond to the build number and correspond with the class number. Your actual sail number will depend on whether you’re racing PHRF in which case you’ll be given a different number.

    The first 3 digits of the HIN are the manufacturer’s id, the next five are the serial number and the final four are the date of manufacture.

    #3253
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    HIN:

    PCX Pacific Yachts
    30 Olson 30
    XXX Build #
    XXXX mo yr of build

    #3254
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Spar Wars: PCX302120583

    #3255

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Thanks for your input.
    What numbers would then be a 155, a 125 and a 95% sail?
    Thanks for the HIN decoding

    #3256
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Those are percentages of “J”. “J” on an Olson is 11.8 ft. Multiply the numbers times 11.8 for the LP measurement of the sail. LP is the max length from the clew to the luff. This is known as the amount of overlap to the rig. Actual % is LP divided by 11.8.

    #3257
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    A 155% is a number 1 sail (usually light material). 150 is an all purpose #1. 147 is a heavy one. 125-130 is a # two. 95-100 is a three. 85 is a 4. Anything less is storm.

    #3258

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Thanks Bruce!
    What is the wind range you would use each sail?

    This is a question by someone who is used to roller reefing on cruisers…. So new to this sail change and racing thing…

    Cheers

    #3259
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Racing:

    Lt #1 to 6 knts true; heavy #1 6 to 14 true; I go to the #3 @ 20+ apparent ws.

    Waves…keep the #1’s longer and move lead car aft to spill the top some.

    This will invite MANY opinions on sail selection. One opinion sure to arrive is the need, if any, for a #2. I’ve never used one and don’t hear of many that do. I suppose if you were short on crew, it could take over after the light #1.

    #3263

    Old School
    Participant

    #2’s are absolute weapons. Old School sailed with AP#1 (which was pretty light), 2, and 3. In 14-18, a well sailed boat with a #2 will kill any boat with only #1 or #3.

    #3264

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Hi Old School,
    Do you think your #2 experience holds for solo sailing?
    I feel that using #1 and #3 sailing solo would be easier with fewer sail changes… Makes sense?

    #3266

    Old School
    Participant

    I actually think that for solo, it would make more sense to have the #2. The boats do not take much power to move. Once I raced against O’Naturel. He was DH, I had five. I carried the #1 in 10 knots, he carried the #3. We were quicker, but not as much as you might think!

    An excellent option for SH sailing is to ditch the #1 altogether. Carry the #2 as your primary upwind sail, and take the rating credit! Probably worth 6 seconds. I think that when SH, the only time you would see an appreciable difference between a 1 and a 2 is in 3-4 knots of breeze.

    #2’s take less energy to tack and stow. This is a big consideration when SH.

    #3269

    Jean Andre
    Participant

    Thanks Old School, your advice makes plenty of sense… I like it… less sail to tack is always good…

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