Al Holt

 

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Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 56 total)
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  • in reply to: Elliptical rudder? #2828

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Lilya!
    I’m at
    al@holtmarinesystems.com
    May I please have a copy of your CAD file of the elliptical rudder??
    I accept dwg files!
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Elliptical rudder? #2820

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I bought my first Olson 30 in 1985. It was a great ride. Three boats:
    Think Fast!
    Run Wild
    Kestrel
    I was class president in 1989. I sailed in the Nationals when the top spots were all professionals. I can’t remember, but I think I sailed in the nationals five times and finished 5th twice. San Francisco (twice), Santa Cruz, Seattle, Tahoe,as best I remember. I was humiliated in Seattle and Santa Cruz, but I have a Tee shirt signed by George. It’s a treasure.
    Al

    in reply to: Elliptical rudder? #2816

    Al Holt
    Participant

    In my experience, the metal posts are a mistake. Eventually, they get bent. Unbending them is problematical. I’ve had three original rudders and two elliptical rudders. All had fibreglass rudderposts and gave good service. In one case, a rock at Pt. Bonita drove the rudder up through the bottom of the boat. The rudderpost sprang back and the rudder worked perfectly for the trip back to the yard and an emergency haulout. Aside from the repair to the tip, there was no repair necessary to the rudder. The hull was a different matter.
    As to changing the rudderpost, I don’t know for sure, but I would say it’s a bad idea. The stresses are enormous. When the rudder is made, provision is made to transfer the load to the rudderpost. I question whether you can take out the post without compromising the integrity of the part.
    Al

    Al

    in reply to: Elliptical rudder? #2813

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Over the years, I’ve had two Olson 30 elliptical rudders made by Ron Moore and I was never disappointed. That said, Brian Jones of Annapolis has made several rudders recently (for friends of mine, not for me) and the owners are pleased. Here is Brian’s URL
    http://bcboatworks.com/
    You could compare prices.
    Building a rudder is a challenging project. It will be a lot of work unless you are an experienced craftsman. Should you undertake the project, I suggest you get as much advice as possible from good sources.
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Jock Strap Physics #2734

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Fixing the deck to the mast at the partners is structurally helpful. I use an aluminum channel cut precisely to length. It keeps the the deck from going up OR down. Again, the goal is to keep the hull from flexing. The halyards pull up on the deck at the partners and your crew presses the deck down. Flexing reduces the life of the hull. But this does not do the same thing as the jock strap.
    Al

    in reply to: Jock Strap Physics #2731

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Halyard locks are a good idea because you gain better control of luff tension. They do reduce mast compression by an amount equal to halyard tension. Unless you put 1000 pounds of halyard tension on your sail, this will be small compared to the roughly 2 tons of compression from the shrouds, plus whatever you put on the headstay with your 50:1 backstay. Again, single or double spreader rig is irrelevant. Most folks put only a small amount of tension on the intermediates.
    If your cabinet work has not pulled away from the hull yet, then you are getting significant stiffening from it, but it will not keep the hull from flexing to the degree that a proper jock strap will.
    Al

    in reply to: Jock Strap Physics #2728

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I favor using a jockstrap setup, but most of those I see are useless. The reason for the BOD/jockstrap structural stiffening is to prevent TINY flexure of the hull that will make big differences in shroud and headstay tension when you sail in gusty winds/big waves with lots of crew on the rail.
    To do this the BOD needs to take an enormous compression load and the jockstrap takes an enormous load in tension with miniscule strain (compression for BOD and stretching of the jockstrap).
    The shroud load on my boat is 1800# on each side after I set up the rig and at the dock. That compression load is on the mast no matter how your boat is rigged. If you have an oversize rod jockstrap, as I do, the boat does not flex appreciably when you initially set up your rig. The load is transmitted from the chainplates to the mast step via the jockstrap…and remember I use an incredibly stiff one. The tendency of the lowers to squeeze the hull is offset by the BOD. Whether you have a single spreader rig or a double-spreader rig is irrelevant.
    Without the jockstrap the hull will flex as the compression load on the mast changes (under sail). That flexure is an enemy of your hull for durability and an enemy of consistent sail trim when racing.
    That’s my two cents.
    Al

    in reply to: NA’s Event Discussion #2700

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I know the information I seek must be there somewhere, but I can’t find it. Exactly which races comprise the Olson 30 North Americans? I’m making tentative plans to attend and I need to know when to arrive and when we will depart.
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Lake Ontario 300 #2644

    Al Holt
    Participant

    There’s an outside chance I am. If I don’t sell my boat and if I can get the title to this trailer that Wilby brought down to Baltimore and if I don’t lose my job and if the NAs are up there at a convenient time, THEN it would be something very attractive to me.
    Al

    in reply to: Swim ladder #2643

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Our approach has been to hang a line over the transom with one or two bowlines at convenient levels. The scupper recesses make the final steps needed for climbing back aboard.
    I thought about fashioning a more comfortable approach, but the Olson 30 crowd has not shown much interest in my many other (dazzling) commercial offerings, so I’ve turned to other markets. Let me know if you find something that works!
    Al

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2566

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Hey Scott, that’s snazzy. Do you have a separate assembly on each side of the chainplate bulkhead or just the one BOD fastened to aft side…the one we can see?

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2557

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Okay. Here’s the picture of Kestrel’s BOD.

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2556

    Al Holt
    Participant

    My JPEG was too big so I tried DOCX as a workaround. I don’t know how to compress the file. Re: turnbuckle. All three of the Olson 30s I have owned have the turnbuckle. Yes, it might be a tiny help, but trust me, it makes very little difference in preventing the hull from compressing. I replaced the turnbuckle with a solid piece of aluminum precisly cut to length. It prevents the deck from moving either way, up or down. This is needed because of big guys walking on the deck and large forces from halyards pulling the deck up. Please note: That aluminum angle buckled when I tightened the shrouds without pinning the angle at the halfway point. That’s a solid experimental result. Yes the deck was pinned to the mast at the partners. Can anybody help me with compressing these files? I’ll email them to you and you can post them…or whatever. al@holtmarinesystems.com

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2554

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Here’s a picture of mine on Kestrel. It is 1/5″x1/5″x3/16″ aluminum alloy 6061 that I bought from McMaster Carr online. I needed slightly longer bolts at the ends for going through the chainplates. It’s a pretty inexpensive fix. You can see that it is fastened at the mast. I tried it first without pinning it at the mast and it buckled when I tightened the shrouds. I haven’t had any problem since pinning it at the halfway point. The reason for using the BOD is to help keep the boat from flexing. When a gust hits and you have 6 heavies on the rail, any flexing of the boat changes the sail shape in the wrong direction. A STIFF BOAT IS A HAPPY BOAT.

    in reply to: Parting out An Olson 30 #2546

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I would like to acquire a trailer. Please contact me if you have one available. al@holtmarinesystems.com

    in reply to: Fore hatch spinnaker bag #2521

    Al Holt
    Participant

    We turned the hatch around on Kestrel, too. Chaotic? Never been a problem. We don’t store anything forward of the mast. The vee berth platform makes a happy home for the kite. I have a theory that the cloth is slightly damaged every time you “stuff” the kite into a bag. Maybe I’m wrong. My kites do, yet, seem pretty crispy.
    Al
    Kestrel

    in reply to: Fore hatch spinnaker bag #2515

    Al Holt
    Participant

    No bag. We just douse into the Vee berth and use a bit of velcro on the hatch combing to retain the head of the sail handy for re-attaching the halyard. We’ve cleaned off all the meat hooks, bolts & such, so there isn’t anything to snag on.
    Al Holt #114 “Kestrel”

    in reply to: Fiberglass Rudder Shaft crack #2478

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Good approach to the repair, but I favor acetone, too.
    Al

    in reply to: Jock Strap Failure #2469

    Al Holt
    Participant

    No, Jim. That’s just a scratch. It has a cousin on the other side. I think it is an artifact of the bending operation. Those old boys at KATO Marine showed Tubalcain how to make the fasteners for Noah’s yacht. They would not be so silly as to send along a cracked part.
    Yes. They do know how to polish stainless steel. I suspect them of using a tumbler, but I’ve never asked.
    Al

    in reply to: Jock Strap Failure #2467

    Al Holt
    Participant

    As promised, here are pictures of the old and new jock strap tang for Kestrel. The fabricator says there should be meat around the hole equal to one diameter of the hole as a rule of thumb. As you can see, the old tang doesn’t meet that standard. He also pointed out that the thickness of the old tang had be ground down, perhaps to fit inside the clevis on the jock strap fitted by an earlier owner. He wasn’t buying my theory of embrittlement. He also set aside electrolysis and wear as factors.

    in reply to: LD Safety Requirements #2459

    Al Holt
    Participant

    The floorboard thickness is 1/2 inch. I’ve never heard they are to be weighed. I have a CAD file of replacement floorboards I made for my boat. If you will email me directly I’ll send along the CAD ( .dxf) file and some pictures. Mine are slightly modified (improved, I think) from the originals, but you could use my file as a starting point if you want to be authentic. al@holtmarinesystems.com

    in reply to: Sails #2439

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Jiri, I’ll be interested in others’ experience, as well. We have tried it both at the normal tack hook on the bow and at the foreguy fitting on the deck. I can’t see much difference. I think the tack hook might be better as long as there is enough wind to keep the kite working. It gives more projected area. The staysail/windseeker we’re using now is large enough to rob wind out of the kite and in very light conditions it does more damage than good regardless where we tack it down. We have used the toe rail when farther off the wind.
    To reiterate, we have seen the staysail make a difference against boats that did not have one. When the wind conditions are right, it’s definitely an advantage to use it.

    in reply to: Sails #2437

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Our experience is the same as that of Bruce Rand. We carry a staysail to use on reaches if the distance offsets the hassle of putting it up. It is a light sail that doubles as a high-clewed windseeker when tacked forward. On windy days, we leave the blade up on the reaches instead of using the staysail. It saves hassle at the windward and leeward marks, prevents tight wraps on the jibes, and gives us the option of additional drive on the reaches when we need it.

    in reply to: Rig Tension #2434

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Hi Jason,
    It’s just the way I’ve always done it. At some point a professional rigger pointed out that the lowers on larger boats are generally of a larger diameter than the uppers and that is because the lowers must work against the force placed on the spreader by the cap shrouds. So…the lowers need to be tighter in order to keep the lower part of the mast where it belongs. i.e. there is a lot of force pushing the mast to leeward at that point. The jock strap and BOD will form another set of spreaders below decks and will help to get the load off of your vintage flexi-flyer. I think you should make your move. It does make a big difference in rig tension. You should keep in mind that the jock strap will be offsetting the load of BOTH the cap shrouds and the lowers, so it should be a larger diameter rod than either. The point is that you don’t want it to stretch, which is to say, allow the boat to flex. Properly done, the loads are enormous.
    That’s my two cents on the subject.
    Al

    Al

    in reply to: Rig Tension #2428

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I have a single spreader rig. I use 1000# in the lowers and 800# in the uppers. The slack in the leeward shrouds depends on how much tension I have on the backstay, how much mainsheet I have on, and the number of people on the rail. I think it is not a good measure of anything.
    Al

    in reply to: Call for 2012 NA’s site #2410

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I’m tentatively planning to get on the road next year. I’m interested in sailing in Charleston, Long Island Sound, and Kingston.
    In Kingston, I favor an inexpensive July NAs and leaving my boat in Canada to come back for CORK.
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Call for 2012 NA’s site #2400

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Question about Charleston. Do you sail in the ocean or in Charleston Harbor?
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Fiberglass Rudder Shaft crack #2381

    Al Holt
    Participant

    There’s a picture of my rudderhead and pricing at my website
    http://www.holtmarinesystems.com
    That price includes the anodizing, which I get done by professionals. If you want to do without anodizing or if you have a better source, you can take $75 off the price. I offer some other Olson 30 stuff there as well.
    Al

    in reply to: Call for 2012 NA’s site #2369

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Screwpile at Solomon’s on the Chesapeake is still a possibility. It is centrally located.
    The truth is there are really only two Olson 30s reliably sailing races in the Chesapeake: Monkey Business and Kestrel. The NAs could bring out others. There are plenty of boats, but they just don’t sail.
    If you can bring in enough boats from elsewhere, this is a great place to race. The race committees are professional level. We had a wonderful regatta this past summer. I know the race committee will give us a start if we can muster up the six or so boats we need. There is a 40 mile feeder race. My dock in Annapolis is available for anyone who needs temporary storage and friendship.
    This is not an inexpensive place to sail, but we can work to minimize your costs.
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Fiberglass Rudder Shaft crack #2368

    Al Holt
    Participant

    It should be possible to repair your rudder post.
    This is a problem with some of the stock rudderheads. They do not clamp firmly against the rudderpost. My own rudderhead cracked and I machined a replacement. Since then, I cut a pattern and have castings made to replace the Olson 30 rudderheads. I did this at considerable personal expense, thinking others would want effective rudderheads. This exercise was discouraging because I’ve had no inquiries.
    The problem is that you have been turning your rudder using the throughbolt. That should not be done. The rudderhead should clamp tightly against the rudderpost. My new rudderhead is in two parts and I can precisely machine the 2″ hole so the rudderhead is firmly against the rudderpost and friction is transmitting the force to it.
    Bolts are not intended to function in shear. They function in tension and hold things together. Rivets function in shear. That’s why bridge girders are held together with rivets.
    That’s the difference between a bolt and a clevis pin. A clevis pin functions in shear. It’s the same problem. Don’t use bolts to replace clevis pins. Don’t use bolts to replace rivets.
    I can provide a rudderhead that clamps firmly on your rudderpost.
    That’s my two cents worth.
    Al Holt

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 56 total)