Al Holt

 

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Viewing 26 posts - 31 through 56 (of 56 total)
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  • in reply to: Jock Strap Failure #2356

    Al Holt
    Participant

    The channel under the mast step is aluminum. The tang, jock strap, and clevis pin are all stainless steel. We’ll get a good look at both sides once I get everything apart, but I don’t think there is enough motion here to cause wear. I suspect the rust-like stains are evidence the hole was actually made by burning rather than drilling. This would account for embrittlement.
    I don’t buy the wear/electrolysis explanation.
    I’ll send along some closeups for public forensics as winter wears on. I’m too busy to pull the stick at just this moment.

    in reply to: Jock Strap Failure #2341

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I uploaded a couple of pictures into Kestrel’s album.
    Al

    in reply to: Keel Bold Nut #2328

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I don’t know the answer to either question, but as usual I have a sea story for you. Back in the 90s I brought Think Fast! back from the East Coast to San Francisco. A Santana 35 tried to make two Olson 15’s out of her, so I was looking for a new boat. That’s another story, but anyway, I found a boat in Salt Lake City that had been sitting in the hot desert for a couple of years and I figured, what the hell, it must be dry. Well, I brought her back to Brickyard Cove and we sailed her the remainder of the season much as she was. Since we dry-sailed, I had a good look at the joint between the lead and the stubby each time we pulled the boat. Well, there was this developing “bead” along the length of the joint. We were going dogmeat slow upwind and I began to wonder if the slows and the bead were related. At the end of the season, I took the boat to Santa Cruz or Watsonville or someplace down there to the surfer guys. They dropped the keel and found that there was a flexible caulk between the keel and the lead. The keel was moving back and forth on successive tacks and compressing the caulk. Of course, my friends took care of me and cleaned that s___ out. They made the keel symmetric, properly bedded it and tightened the keel bolts. I had the boat painted white by Kim Desenberg in Alameda. Then, on the advice of my crew, I looked up one of those guys who paints naked ladies on race cars to get an air brush of a Cheetah and Run Wild! painted on the hull, including pawprints up the transom.
    The boat turned out very fast after that. I made the serious mistake of selling her before I came back to the east coast in 1997.
    So, my only contribution is to say, “Yes”. The keel should be tightly bolted to the hull. My advice is to get help from professionals.
    Al

    in reply to: Pointing vs. J80’s, Soverel 33s, etc. #2298

    Al Holt
    Participant

    More rake will lower the clew. The shape of the sail is determined by how it was cut, halyard tension, headstay tension, trim car position, and the sheet.
    Halyard tension drives the draft forward. Headstay tension: loose=baggy draft aft, tight=flatter, draft forward.
    Car position and sheet control overall draft and the amount of twist in the sail. Moreover, car too far forward closes off the leech and the slot. Car too far aft twists off the top of the sail and it luffs. Car just right creates a steering groove the helmsman can sail, but narrow enough that he is challenged and his attention does not wander.
    That’s my two cents worth.
    Al

    Al

    in reply to: Pointing vs. J80’s, Soverel 33s, etc. #2295

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Our experience is that pointing is enabled by headstay tension [tighter = better pointing] and the cut of the sails. I think fore and after position of the mast determines whether you have weather helm or lee helm. In stiffer breezes the amount of helm is easily adjusted with mainsail trim. It’s in the light breezes that you need a bit of weather helm…determined by the position of the sail plan fore and aft. The reason is that when you have lee helm the rudder is working AGAINST the keel. The keel needs a greater angle of attack and so develops more drag. With weather helm, the rudder is HELPING the keel and that reduces total drag so long as you haven’t overdone it. Too much weather helm gets the rudder into an inefficient angle of attack and you’re back to more drag. This is the reason people say “rake the mast to point better”. It’s because most boats have not been carefully balanced for a weather helm in light going. Raking the mast moves the sailplan aft and develops the needed weather helm.
    That’s my two cents worth.
    Al

    in reply to: Pointing vs. J80’s, Soverel 33s, etc. #2284

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I forgot to say that I was PHRF A2 high point winner in the Annapolis Area in 1998 and 1999 in my Soverel 33. In light winds, you should not expect your Olson 30 to point with a Soverel 33, which has a very thick keel that will make a Farr 30 squirm when it comes to squeezing up after rounding the leeward mark in light winds.
    Al

    in reply to: Pointing vs. J80’s, Soverel 33s, etc. #2283

    Al Holt
    Participant

    We race against Soverel 33s, J80s, and lots of other boats. Our experience is different. We find the newer boats have more effective keels and can profitably point higher than we can when it comes to distance made good to the weather mark. We do not try to point with newer boats generally in any winds. We find that our best result is to point a little lower and to foot. This puts us at a disadvantage at the start, where we generally need to tack away early for clear air and to get the boats off our lee bow.
    That said, the Olson 30 will point very high when you need to. As Jason said, when you need to get around a mark, then heel the boat and enjoy lift from the hull. You can save your bacon and get where you want to go. I just don’t think its a fast way to sail the balance of the course.
    The J80 one design fleet in Annapolis has acquired remarkable performance. We’ve seen some results that will amaze you. We cannot save our time on a well-sailed J80. That is true. Hands down.
    I offer this with some humility, but I will point out that Kestrel was 2007 high point winner in PHRF A3 in 2007 and second place in PHRF A3 in 2009 in the Annapolis area. We had 15-20 boats on the line much of the time.
    That’s my two cents worth about pointing.
    Al

    in reply to: Crew Work Manual #2265

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Well, Peter, if the worlds are to be in Nova Scotia, it is only fair that the Chesapeake Bay gang sponsor the Inter-Galactics.

    in reply to: Downwind Angles – Deep or hot? #2257

    Al Holt
    Participant

    In the heavier going we round down from time to time and then broach from time to time. I tell the crew I do it on purpose to keep them on their toes.

    in reply to: Downwind Angles – Deep or hot? #2255

    Al Holt
    Participant

    We heat up in the lighter going. I think this is common. It increases the relative wind velocity and helps keep the kite full. As the breeze builds, we sail closer to straight downwind. Like you, we heat up a bit at the top end to reduce the death roll tendency. We do find that a bit of pole forward in the stronger stuff stabilizes the boat and permits us to sail pretty close to straight downwind.

    in reply to: Asymmetricals vs Symmetrical #2254

    Al Holt
    Participant

    We couldn’t make it work around the buoys. I believe we do better sailing almost straight downwind with an S-kite that we could by jibing back and forth with the A-kite. We never found a wind angle that paid. I think part of it is that we used a class legal pole. That doesn’t get the tack very far ahead of the boat. The new boats set up for A-kites have long sprits that greatly increase the projected area. Yes, they have better hull shapes, but I think the big difference is the long sprits.
    Al

    in reply to: Asymmetricals vs Symmetrical #2241

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I know. I know. Our PHRF committee appears not to be swayed by facts or by what others do. For example, the Olson 29 is rated level with the Olson 30 on the Chesapeake. Arguments about newer, improved boat and how the boats are rated elsewhere are completely ignored.

    in reply to: Asymmetricals vs Symmetrical #2236

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Work on the PHRF committee? They know very well that anything I want is to my advantage. Being fair is not an issue here.

    in reply to: Asymmetricals vs Symmetrical #2235

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Work on the PHRF committee? They know very well that anything I want is to my advantage. Being fair is not an issue here.

    in reply to: Asymmetricals vs Symmetrical #2233

    Al Holt
    Participant

    A few years back I tried A-kites. I bought two from North and began the season here with them. We can elect A or S with no penalty, but cannot carry both w/o a penalty.
    My conclusions: The Olson 30 has blazing speed on a reach with an A-kite. There is less tendency to be unstable and the drive of the kite is awesome. It’s a ride you won’t forget. However, on a windward-leeward course with drop marks, we could not find a wind angle that made it pay. Our boats do so well nearly straight downwind…given any breeze at all…that jibing back and forth like a Melges 24 just didn’t work for us. Half-way through the season we went back to the S-kite. On the other hand, if the local PHRF committee allows both with no penalty, I would carry the A-kites on board, for sure. They are a real kick on the Olson 30 on a reach. I used only the one design legal pole.

    in reply to: Boom Weak? #2214

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Over the years, I have broken two Olson 30 booms. They broke at the vang attachment each time.
    I believe the booms Buzz provides now are much more robust. I have abused my present one with no ill effects.
    Incidentally, one way to break a boom is to raise the main with the vang on. Bluto will keep looking for the hard spots along the luff while the leech enjoys significant leverage at the end of the boom. That is not fair to the boom or your mainsail. I know most of you guys know all that, but maybe it will help a newcomer save some $$.
    Al

    in reply to: Mast location #2183

    Al Holt
    Participant

    For Kestrel: 24 3/16″
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Bottom #2179

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I wet sail and use Baltaplate. I dive my boat weekly, an activity I consider recreation. It stays in good shape in the brackish water of the Chesapeake. That said, smart guys have told me what works well in one locality may or may not work elsewhere. I think the best advice is to check with local racing boats to see what has worked/not worked for them.

    in reply to: Templates #2173

    Al Holt
    Participant

    We rely on our knotmeter for help in determining whether we are in fair or foul current by comparing it to our GPS SOG. Current considerations are important where we sail.
    We also tempt fate sometimes to get out of foul current by sailing into the shallows. The depthfinder is pretty handy in that case.
    If we can find CAD drawings of templates, I can cut a set or two on my CNC machine and send them along to those who want them. I’d ask to be reimbursed for materials and shipping.

    in reply to: Kg’s for stays/shrouds #2172

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Yes. Single spreader. Well, I guess it’s just the way I’ve always done it. I really don’t mean for the uppers to be loose. I just want the lowers tighter than the uppers. Intuitively, it’s like stacking up legos. You make the bottom part broad and sound, then you put things on top of it. If you do the reverse, it’s unstable. The uppers are depending on the spreaders to stay in place when the load is on the rig. A little displacement of the lowers, which are short, translates to a big displacement of the spreaders and a bigger displacement of the uppers. I don’t know how else to explain my view, but you might take a look at some big boats. I think you will see that the lowers have larger diameter rods than the uppers. This is for the same reason I’m pointing out, namely that you want the spreader firmly fixed in place to make the uppers effective.
    Just an opinion. I’m wrong a fair amount of the time and I might be about this.
    Al

    in reply to: Kg’s for stays/shrouds #2168

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I have a different take. I keep my lowers tighter than the uppers. Using the Loos, I run about 1000# on the lowers and about 800# on the uppers.

    in reply to: Jib Sheets #2163

    Al Holt
    Participant

    You aroused my curiosity. I measured mine at 50′. I have moved the turning blocks back to the toe rail, which requires some extra length. My winches are cabin top. Even so, I’d say mine are likely longer than they need to be.

    in reply to: Inboard Removal #2162

    Al Holt
    Participant

    For the outboard bracket, I use four bolts through the transom, like on the Melges 24 [but on the transom, not the cockpit sole]. Each bolt has a copper bushing and large washer on the OUTSIDE to raise the bolt head above the surface of the transom. I fashioned the bracket with four keyhole-shaped openings that drop over the bolt-heads and then fall into place. I rely on gravity and friction to keep the engine in place. I think this has a couple of advantages over the extruded plate that came with the boat. Firstly, one can clearly see that the mount is in place Secondly, I think it looks better than the big transom plate. I’ll send pictures if you like. It has the same disadvantage as the original mount, which is that it is hard to install/remove in a seaway. Good luck with the removal of the inboard. I think you are on the right track there.

    in reply to: Proposal for 2011 AGM – Online Activities #2086

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I agree.
    Making the site a “one stop shopping” will concentrate interest. The voting scheme worked well, even in the view of those who lost the election.
    Thanks to “Old School” for the energy put into this.
    Al Holt

    in reply to: Rigging plan? #2082

    Al Holt
    Participant

    I agree with Old School. Cam cleats are not strong enough for a genoa halyard. We use halyard stoppers on the deck for genoa and main halyards, indeed, we use “oversized” ones not ordinarily used on 30-footers. We use a pair of cam cleats on the mast for the spinnaker. Works pretty well. Years ago, I used a single cam cleat on the mast for the kite, but in a breeze it would occasionally let go. Yikes!
    Al

    in reply to: Rig Tension #2081

    Al Holt
    Participant

    Hi Derek,
    Here’s my opinion, free, and worth every penny of it.
    The amount of slack in the leeward shrouds will depend more on how much you are bending your mast than on the original shroud tension. Mainly, you are trying to prevent athwartships bending of the spar under all conditions. Look up the spar when sailing. If the top is bending to leeward, you need more capshroud tension and vice versa. My own experience is that the lowers should be the tightest, the capshrouds second tightest and the intermediates, if you have them, should be just tight enough to keep the spar straight.
    If you are using a lot of prebend, the lee shrouds will get very loose. If you are using near zero pre-bend as most of us do these days, then they will go a bit loose, but not as much so.
    Al

Viewing 26 posts - 31 through 56 (of 56 total)