Bill Vosteen

 

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Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 35 total)
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  • in reply to: New #1 genoa #3885

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Is Kingston Sail Loft $2700 Canadian? Knock 25% off for US dollars, so about $2040 US. Though, they’re probably used to selling to US customers and quoted you US. It was a nice thought while it lasted.

    in reply to: #218 in refit #3816

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Check out: http://www.olson30.org/the-boat/tips-and-tweaks/deck-setup-for-buoy-racing Good suggestions and photos of your deck layouts.

    in reply to: #218 in refit #3815

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Jib tracks: #3 is on the cabin top just ahead of the hand rail or inside the stays. Some remove a section of the teak trim, others mount the track just inside the teak trim. Genoa tracks on the deck can be much shorter if you only use the cabin top #3 tracks. I have sailed in conditions where we used to stock #3 track position on the deck when punching through steep waves. You loose pointing ability for power. If you use a 140% for a #2, you deck tracks can end just ahead of the back of the cabin. The genoa track goes aft to the mid cockpit then to turning blocks. We should be able to get someone to post some photos of deck layouts for you. My boat is long gone or I’d help you.
    Enjoy,

    in reply to: Eastern CT Sailing Assoc PHRF #3768

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I’m guessing you have a good race record and they’re trying to single you out. I have a friend on Lake Ontario with a Soverel 33, the LO phrf committee kept hitting them as a fleet, mainly because they were well sailed boats compared to the rest of their fleet. It truly wasn’t fair. Hopefully they’re not out to get you, though it does sound like this might be the case. If you look, the Soverel 33 is normally 90+, in Lake Ontario they sail with an 81 handicap. This can happen when good sailors gravitate towards a boat.
    Good luck.

    in reply to: Eastern CT Sailing Assoc PHRF #3764

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I would use the argument of improving the integrity of the boat and extending its life, not noticeable improvements on the race course.

    in reply to: Twings Setup #3736

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    We would almost need to see your hardware to tell you what to do. In general the twings are set up just in front of the center stanchion on the rail. Most would use a Holt dinghy snatch block on the sheets, with a block on the rail. Some would have a cam cleat on the rail but most would run the twing back to the cockpit and have a cam cleat on the side of the cabin.

    I hope this helps.

    Bill

    in reply to: Carbon Mast #3734

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I think you know the answer, of course owners have thought about it. If you got a carbon mast, with less weight aloft, your boat would have a better righting moment which would effectively give you a stiffer boat which is a positive. The main negative is that you would never get the investment back when you sold your boat. You wouldn’t be a class boat and couldn’t race with it in class events with the carbon mast. It would help in handicap racing, though they would adjust your handicap accordingly.

    in reply to: New Owner Hull #111 #3733

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Once an Olson 30 captures your heart and mind, it becomes a lifetime relationship whether you own a boat or not. Truly a great boat.

    in reply to: New Owner Hull #111 #3730

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Also, don’t pinch!!

    in reply to: New Owner Hull #111 #3729

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    The main tip I would recommend for fluky winds is to try to maintain a steady course and have your trimmers do most of the work. Changing course in light air kills your speed more in a uldb than a heavier boat. Good luck!

    in reply to: Boat Pox and Keel Templates #3698

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I did my boat’s bottom over 20 years ago. The best way to attack the pox is to sand blast them. It did an incredible job and will open up pox you had no idea were there and also remove all bad material deeper in the cavities. I highly recommend sand blasting. It doesn’t take all that long once you’re set up. I’m thinking I rented the sand blaster, I can’t remember where I got it. Check out the different abrasives, there are some that work better than others.

    Once the pox are open, thoroughly wash them out and let them dry out completely before fairing, then multiply coats of barrier. I never had any sign of problems after this.

    Good luck,

    in reply to: Cockpit Drains #3679

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Shad,

    You can read about other’s opinions of eliptical rudders under Olson 30 media and facts, boat upgrades: http://www.olson30.org/the-boat/tips-and-tweaks/rudders
    I could see both sides of the argument here. Single handed you should be sailing fast but not right on the edge, on the edge would be too taxing on the driver, though if the elliptical saves you a couple of crashes, it might be worth it.

    in reply to: Cockpit Drains #3657

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    PS, my boat was a factory yellow Olson 30

    in reply to: Cockpit Drains #3656

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Stern waves are not a problem, unless they’re mountainous huge. I swamped my cockpit while over taking waves. We had enough boat speed to climb up the backs of the waves, then surf down the face burying the bow in the back of the next wave. We had green water over the whole deck of the boat filling the cockpit. It took quite a few minutes for the cockpit to drain, it seemed like a long time, (this was twenty years ago) and the extra weight negatively effected the handling. All of the sheets got sucked through the drains. We needed to have someone reach over the stern and untie the stopper knots so we could pull the sheets back through the drains to open them up.

    To get an idea of the speed of your drains, plug the drains, fill the cockpit with water, then open the drains and time how long if takes to drain.

    Bill

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3544

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Both PHRF and IRC give you a single number rating that is used in all conditions. There are other rating systems that adjust the rating for the conditions, wind speed, etc., Complicated but is suppose to help with fleets of mixed boat designs.

    in reply to: What is the Baby stay for? #3496

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I agree with Bruce. Double spreader masts were never stock on the Olson, they were always added later. I wouldn’t use the baby stay for a storm sail. I don’t think its strong enough at either end to take the beating of true storm situations. You can check with Buzz Ballenger or another mast builder to see what they have to say. Setting up sheeting block would also be a problem.

    in reply to: Play in rudder post #3488

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Ray,

    Using West Epoxy and the high density filler is used to fill the worn rudder shaft. Use a hand or palm sander and take your time, only use enough epoxy to fill the grooves. Do not use a grinder, you won’t have enough control and could do more harm.

    in reply to: Mast Repair #3417

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Do you have a good welder around? I would think a welder would be able to help you.

    in reply to: Fiberglass Repair #3349

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I agree with Jim. West Systems has a little booklet that can help you. See Chapter 5 in: http://www.westsystem.com/ss/assets/HowTo-Publications/Fiberglass-Boat-Repair-and-Maintenance.pdf

    Basically you drill some small holes to inspect the balsa core, if dry, drill holes every inch or two over the delaminated area, squirt epoxy in the holes, clamp till the epoxy is cured, then fill and fair the holes. It also describes a full repair you need to removed the skin and recore the area. Hopefully your balsa core is dry, if so, its pretty easy. If the core is just damp and there isn’t any rot, then you need to dry the core before repairing. If the core is rotted, then there’s a more serious repair, not impossible but laying up fiberglass is an art and it will be a bit more challenging to lay it up nicely.

    My feeling is that you can use it for the season without any problems, you aren’t going to damage anything and unless the transom has large areas delaminated, especially near the backstay chainplates. The area near the waterline can be cleaned out and filled with epoxy for the season without doing any damage. Leaving this open will allow more water intrusion. Duct tape is OK but really not good enough to prevent more water infiltration. If you know someone with a moisture meter you could see how far the water infiltration has proceded. Good luck, let us know if you have any other questions.

    in reply to: Autopilot mount #3340

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    When I had my Olson 30, I had a removable block of wood with the pin socket for the tiller pilot mounted to the coaming.One advantage to having coamings.

    After looking at Ray’s position on his tiller pilot, you need to keep in mind, the farther you mount the it away from the tiller post, the more leverage and control the tiller pilot will have. Try to mount it so it near the end of the tiller for best leverage.

    in reply to: Stepping Mast #3157

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    There are many YouTube videos showing a gin pole in use. I searched with “sailboat, mast, gin pole” and got 1300 hits. Most boats will be smaller and deck stepped. You need to keep in mind that your gin pole needs to be tall enough to lift the balance point, or just above the balance point above the deck opening for the mast. I remember some discussions on the old Olson 30 site where they used a boken J24 mast. Following is my Youtube search.

    Good luck,

    Bill

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sailboat+mast+gin+pole&oq=sailboat+mast+gin+pole&gs_l=youtube.3…3156.10406.0.11906.22.18.0.4.4.0.281.1732.2j7j2.11.0…0.0…1ac.1.11.youtube.b11jCCwh1Tw

    in reply to: Spreaders #2921

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Have you called Buzz Ballenger? They built most of the masts on the Olsons.

    Bill
    http://www.ballengerspars.com/
    Ballenger Spar Systems
    215 Walker Street
    Watsonville , CA. 95076
    Phone: 831-763-1196
    Fax: 831-763-1198
    buzzballenger@att.net

    in reply to: LD Distance races this wknd #2917

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Scot,

    If I read it right, you got 2nd in your fleet. Congratulations!! Looks like it was a slow race. Can you give us a quick rundown?

    Bill

    in reply to: Interesting handicap question #2906

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Scott,

    I would stay in the phrf fleet, the speed potentials are much closer. If you’re with a Mumm 30 and OD35, they’re so much faster that you’d have to have a race with all light air or something similar to be able to compete with them.

    Have you compared the IRC ratings against the phrf TOT ratings to if the treat you favorably?

    Good luck,

    Bill

    in reply to: Furniture & Bulkhead #2904

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I repaired my bulkhead years ago, I used 3/8″ marine plywood.

    in reply to: List of rigging #2880

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    You can always contact Dave at Pride Marine, an Olson 30 sailor at http://www.pridemarine.com/ or layline, http://www.layline.com , they’ll have most of the lengths and advice on what folks are using.

    Your old lines are probably fine strength wise. You’d be amazed how bad a line has to be for the strength to e greatly compromised. Most of the strength is in the core and most of the ugliness is in the jacket.

    Bill

    in reply to: Testing the new stability rules #2849

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I don’t know if someone has shared this older sequence of Hoot’s famous crash sequence as shown in Latitude 38:
    http://www.latitude38.com/LectronicLat/2005/0205/204/Feb4.html#anchor415194

    Bill

    in reply to: Class Constitution #2809

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I haven’t owned my Olson 30 for about 10 years, but I’m still a huge fan. The problem you brought up is common with any boat that was seriously raced. There are very few classes, if any, that don’t have this problem in one way or another. Even phrf classes face this in one form or another. I’ve seen local one design fleets deal with this issue by having only one or two new sails a year only to have to buy more new sails when competing outside of their local fleet. The only way to deal with this is to buy a smaller boat to have sails you can afford or plan on not being at the top of your class competitively.

    Bill

    in reply to: Stanchions #2789

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    I have a new 30″ SS stantion which I would like to sell. I’m pretty sure its a Garhauer. I bought it years ago as an extra stantion and forgot to include it when I sold my boat. Make me an offer. Sorry for the marketing.
    Bill

    in reply to: Rig tuning #2689

    Bill Vosteen
    Participant

    Ray,
    Have you measured your forestay length? It should be just over 37 feet. An old survey of Olson 30’s from the 1980’s had the average forestay length of 37 feet 2.5 inches.
    Bill

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 35 total)