Jonathan Pollak

 

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  • in reply to: Forestay Sag #3464

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Bruce, just seeing this. My 2-cents here. A couple years ago I completely ripped out and rebuilt my mast step. This improved boat performance dramatically. However, all of a sudden I had far more headstay sag and the whole boat was flexing more. In other words the mast step was solid and all of the forces were being directed elsewhere. At this point my foredeck is not as I would like it to be. I think that I need to pull the rails and redo the hull deck joint at the very least and maybe do some stiffening. The sag, resulting from the front of the boat flexing up more than it used to, is not something I have completely solved as of yet.

    -Jon

    in reply to: Spinnaker sheets, light vs heavy wind #3463

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    We use New England Ropes “Flight Line” for light air sheets. Light, does not absorb water and don’t need to strip. No shackles. Just tie in with Bowline. Cheaper and lighter that way.

    I use Sampson “MLX” with Tylaska shackles for heavy air.

    Flight Line is good up to low to mid teens. Change over after that.

    -Jon

    in reply to: How much are these sails worth #3355

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Honestly, and just my opinion here… these sails would have little or no resale value. Composites of this age have almost no value. They have almost always started to delaminate and the technology for composite sails has grown by orders of magnitude in 12 years. Counter-intuitively if they your sails were Dacron (and were not blown) they WOULD have value, but old composite laminates almost always do not. A resale loft such as Bacon Sails does not accept older laminates at all.

    in reply to: Topping lift sheave box #3318

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    They were 2″ sheaves. I forget the exact width. I will try to find the invoice and will let you know tonight. They fit well. You probably do want to get an exact measurement of the pin size in your masthead.

    -Jon

    in reply to: Topping lift sheave box #3314

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I just replaced all four of my masthead sheaves. They were all blown and I was unable to find a readily available commercial sheave of the same size. They were Holt sheaves from England and it would have taken a month. Instead I had custom sheaves made by Zephyrwerks (http://www.zephyrwerks.com). I went in and talked to the guys at APS and they turned me onto them. They only took one week and were under $30 each and were cut to the exact size I wanted. Not certain what size the toping lift sheave is but they could probably make one. Will take a look this weekend before putting the mast back up. In any event I am very happy with the product that they provided.

    -Jon

    in reply to: Ideas on Non-OD Compliant PHRF mods for stiffness?? #3278

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    My understanding is that post aft of the pit below the cockpit was indeed designed to hold the outboard in place. Though I don’t think it’s an acceptable place to have that weight while racing. I strap mine to the base of the mast.

    in reply to: Bilge clean and stringer inspection #3271

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Your stringers look to be in good shape though if I were racing her hard I would replace them. It does not appear to be critical though.

    in reply to: lifting system #3154

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    There is a single point lifting bar that screws onto one of the keel bolts through the deck. A small yacht club crane will then do the trick. However, my dry sail yard simply uses large forklifts to pluck the boat out of the water. Works great.

    in reply to: What to do with my Olson 30? #3136

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I have a crew member who I bet would be interested. I would also be interested in the remnants of the mast if there is enough left to make a gin pole for stepping/unstepping.

    in reply to: Mast step distance #3125

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    My mast step is…. well wherever I want to put it. I have ripped the old one out, have rebuilt the stringers in mahogany and am replacing the rotted out mahogany step with an Aluminum girder. The new step will have a bit less then an inch each way. So looking for a good neutral position.

    in reply to: Mast step distance #3117

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Anyone have an opinion on this?

    in reply to: Athwartship Stringer Replacement #3107

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Stringers #1 and #4 are foam. Mast step [#2] and #3 are wood. It is my feeling that foam is not up to the task for the front stringer. Mine had lost most of its structural integrity. Removing the old glass a foot on either side of 2 and 3 was the hardest part of the demo I found. Though once the beams were removed I found the resin in the blankets had become quite brittle. Enough to simply use a chisel and hammer to separate the layer from the hull. Once this is done some sanding and cleaning gives a large clean bonding area for the new glass and resin. I haven’t been the best with pictures along the way but will post what I have when done.

    Fabricating the beams out of Mahogany to fit the hull is quite time consuming due to the hardness of the material. Though the material really is quite light for its strength and I would think far superior to foam.

    in reply to: Athwartship Stringer Replacement #3102

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Bruce when you laminated your beam with 1×3’s I am assuming they were stacked? Or were they vertical?

    in reply to: Athwartship Stringer Replacement #3101

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Thanks Bruce. I see your pics from your repair. That should be helpful. On closer inspection the main beam was simply widened with the original left in place. This has now compressed almost a centimeter and needs to go as well. Fun times and a delay to the start of racing season [supposed to kick off Saturday…].

    in reply to: Longnitudinal stiffening #2980

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I am not sure if it would work but last year I thought up an idea to use cables to complete the circuit from the headstay to the aft chainplates in a similar manner as the BOD/Jock Straps essentially form a 2nd/3rd spreader and continue the shrouds to the mast step. In this you would tap in some sort of tunnel along the whole base of the boat [maybe pvc pipe or something]. This cable would have a turn buckle in the middle for adjustment. So in effect you would have a complete truss structure in both planes [fore aft/port starboard] from mast bast to masthead. Moreover this truss would be tied into the hull in a very important way. If you just ran a cable from the headstay to the mast step the high aspect dimensions of that part of the truss would require excessive tension to impart a downward force on the headstay. most of the force would be pulling back. With the tabbed in tunnel tied into the base of the hull this would not be the case.

    Just an idea. Not sure if it would work. It would certainly be light.

    -Jon

    in reply to: List of rigging #2889

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Ha Tylaskas may be overkill, but are very nice. I use the smallest ones on my spin halyards and 10+ kt spin sheets. [the MLX sheets]. THOUGH, I didn’t buy them. They were with the boat when I got her. I probably wouldn’t invest in them from from start. I do think there is some gain from having a swiveling shackle when doing lots of sets and douses. They also come in handy when singlehanding for easily blowing the guy with a “spike” and dousing alone. I have employed this a few times and find it quite useful.

    Agreed that tapering would be useful with spin sheets. If you primarily used a single set of sheets.

    in reply to: List of rigging #2886

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Lines break and can only really be expected to have a 4 year active lifespan, tops. I would also recommend having at least one halyard you are willing to bet your life on as you will have to go up the rig. For me this means at least one new halyard per year. How you rig depends largely on how you plan on sailing? However, I don’t think that you can go wrong getting good, but not ridiculous stuff. As far as tapering…. People love to do it and shops love to push it… BUT… IMHO… It is a total waste of money for anything but top level racing. It costs more and SIGNIFICANTLY shortens line life, with only marginal payoff in highly competitive OD racing. Totally useless for PHRF. My rigging shop is Annapolis Performance Sailing [apsltd.com]. Top work and realistic real world advice. I use:

    -V-100 by New England for main and jib halyard
    -MaxiBraid Plus by Yale for 2 spin halyards [anything more expensive for this application is a waste IMO including endura braid]
    -MLX by Samson for heavy spin sheets with Tylaskas
    -small diameter dynema cored line for the light sheets for .5oz chute [forget make], no shackles
    -Toping lift is amsteel
    I forget what I did the jib sheets in.

    in reply to: Interesting handicap question #2862

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Chesapeake is 108 and always has been. Flat water or square faced chop. Almost never surfing. Truly paining downwind takes 25 kts of breeze.

    in reply to: Testing the new stability rules #2843

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Been there….

    in reply to: Elliptical rudder? #2817

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I have heard great things about Brian Jones. He is local down here.

    I believe my rudder was made by these guys and was purchased by the prior owner of my boat:

    http://www.fastcomposites.ca/site/marine/foils-a-z/olson/

    Of note the post is hollow carbon, unlike the solid fiberglass posts of other builders. Very stiff, but [as happened with mine] if there isn’t a perfect fit with the rudder head the post will wear down and become thin at the top. I had to repair and refinish mine and I filled the top of the post with silica reinforced west system. Al Holt made me a custom ruder head based on the slightly elliptical shape of the post and the unit is essentially bullet proof now. If you need a rudder head buy one from Al. This interface is vital for the longevity of your rudder.

    in reply to: Inboard Info Needed! #2602

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I heard about the new mac stability requirements of 103 and the exclusion of many boats that have done it for years. Are they eliminating you? According to this link [saw on sailing anarchy] you are 101, while the other Olson on there is 106 [non inboard I presume.

    http://offshore.ussailing.org/ORR/ORR_Scratch_Sheets/ORR_Windward_Leeward_50_50.htm

    in reply to: Call for 2012 NA’s site #2595

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I would add that I think holding this event on the Chesapeake would likely do a LOT to revitalize a fleet that has really been decimated by adverse decisions by the Chesapeake PHRF committee, notably the elimination of the PHRF A3 class in which it thrived with many boats and the placement of the Olson as the dog of a VERY large PHRF A2 class in which it is not really competitive. There are lots of boats here and many still carry valid ratings and race in their home clubs but they just don’t come out and play in the larger setting. You only need to look at Al, who has been looking to sell his boat the last couple years to see what is going on. Without an outside jolt like holding a large Championship here I fear that the class will continue to dwindle away with increasing disinterest and diminishing investment in boats. Then again having something like holding NA’s here to rally people around could really breath some life back into a fleet that really needs it. That’s my plea for what it’s worth.

    in reply to: Call for 2012 NA’s site #2594

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I would clearly favor Screwpile with the Solomons Overnight Race as a feeder. Though like Al said there are only 2 boats on the Chesapeake that really actively campaign and campaign outside of their home clubs. There are 3 other boats already in Solomons, 9 across the bay in all. If NA’s were here you would draw some out for sure. Though I wouldn’t count on more than 4 local boats. If people traveled here it is essentially guaranteed that Screwpile would accommodate us in our own class.

    Al is in the process of purchasing my trailer so it would be pretty difficult for Monkey Business to travel if it were held elsewhere. I may be interested in signing onto another boat though.

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2578

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Or even better you could take layers of say quarter inch ply, cut them to a templet, and laminate them together with resin and a layer of glass between them. Trim the excess and sand. There would be no need to wrap the outside or try to make it look pretty as the outside layers would still be just wood. That would be very easy to make and extremely strong in compression, tension and torsion.

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2577

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Hey Scott and Jim, are your wood based beams glassed as all or just straight plywood? I am wondering if a glass and resin covered marine plywood bean wouldn’t be an even better solution, still easily homebuilt?

    As for the jockstraps, I have tinkered with my rig endlessly and have found that there is a very direct connection between the tension in the straps and the loads in the shrouds. Which means there is deformation in the hull without the straps when the shrouds are loaded. This can be seen just sitting at the dock and tinkering. However, I also found when I really pushed the boat in a blow with the straps loose and 6 on the rail, it was essentially impossible to keep the mast from falling off [i.e the lee shrouds would be noodleing and sail shape suffering]. I view the BOD as a spreader and the straps as a continuation of the shrouds to the mast step. This is all the more relevant in systems where the beam is pinned to the mast. Thus the loads are contained to a closed system leaving the somewhat flexible hull and deck out of the equation [relatively speaking]. Scott may be correct that they are not necessary, but when the wind picks up on a W/L course with a crew loading the boat up I think that it really helps. Then again Scott seems to sail pretty fast without them…

    in reply to: I Need Photos of BOD #2553

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Pics from 4 different boats are posted at: http://www.olsonuldb.com/olson30/tips/BOD-JS.html

    The only real advantage to the carbon beam is that because it is arched it is much easier to get to the forepeak, which is not a inconsequential factor. My boat has the Pride Marine carbon beam which is very slick, though it came with it. I probably would have gone with a cheeper solution if I were doing it myself. A straight bar is much cheeper and probably stiffer than the carbon beams. Al Holt on “Kestrel” has a very simple and bullet proof solution. Ask him for pics. If I recall it’s a piece of angle iron tied into the chain plates and pinned to the mast. I am sure he can provide details.

    in reply to: Parting out An Olson 30 #2549

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    Ha, well reality is reality at the end of the day. Unfortunately…

    in reply to: Parting out An Olson 30 #2547

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    By those pics she does not appear to be so far gone to call for stripping her at all… someone please buy it! Though you make it rather unatractive proposition after taking the winches, boom and pulpits off.

    in reply to: Rudder Tube #2538

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    That seems like a really really really bad idea to me… It supports the rear deck, manages tremendous forces places on the rudder post, keeps water out of the boat [the tube is essentially open to the sea]. That is a piece of the boat I wouldn’t even think about cutting into. Just my 2 cents.

    in reply to: Parting out An Olson 30 #2534

    Jonathan Pollak
    Participant

    I would hope that someone could want to resurrect this boat. Such a shame to ax it. But… I could probably use a few of those stantions as well as the removable rear hatch door.

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 32 total)