Chris

 

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  • in reply to: B-O-D #3261

    Chris
    Participant

    Autocad….. I feel soo low tech. I used a cardboard template in order to follow the ceiling as accurately as possible. I used plywood that I had laying around and laminated(using epoxy) the various sheets of plywood until an 1.5 inches thick. Then cut out the BOD, from the template, about two inches in height. In other words, the BOD follows the ceiling protruding only 2inches. I wrapped with a couple of layers of carbon for extra stiffness, weighs about six lbs. Once installed I drilled through the deck and the beam and bolted a pad eye in place. Then ran a shroud and turnbuckle from the pad eye to the Ballenger jockstrap plate under the mast, to tie it all together.
    Strong, stiff and least intrusive were my design criteria. A straight aluminum tube is the lightest, simplest and most intrusive.

    in reply to: Non Skid Paint #3250

    Chris
    Participant

    The most affordable way is the American version of Kiwi Grip. I used TreadPlex by Sherwin Williams. About 35.00 per gallon. The spec sheet reads verbatim to KiwiGrip. Use the textured roller. The longer you roll the higher the peaks and coarseness. It’s that simple.

    in reply to: What to do with my Olson 30? #3165

    Chris
    Participant

    Just a reminder I have a stock rudder with a frp post in very very good condition for 500.00. My boat came with the elliptical and stock when I bought it ten years ago. It was coated with several layers of interlux barrier coat. I never used it. Ready for bottom paint.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3023

    Chris
    Participant

    That’s a good question. Tall enough for both rigs. I have the original Spud craft single spreader. I mount the gin pole one foot in front of the partners and it has a foot to spare on the hoist. I’ll take a w.a.g. and say 21 feet. I’ve gotten to the point where I can put the mast up myself, it’s a snap with three.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3021

    Chris
    Participant

    The PHYC has a crane and permanent gin pole. It is free. They close the harbor, where the crane is two days before the Mac. They do this to prepare and transform the grounds to handle the prerace party affectionately known as ” Boat Night “. Boats are rafted up, up and down the Black River( the river the yacht club is on). So if you want to put in a day or two before then make a reservation with the marina ( a stones throw from the yacht club), and pay 100.00 bucks to drop in and borrow my gin pole(free). The marina is set up for a large dry storage of motor boats. They mount slings on a very large forklift. They have put us in three or four times its not a big deal. The name is Desmond marine.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3019

    Chris
    Participant

    Bruce’s plan seems to good to be true. The crew is exhausted on Tuesday after the PH Mac, and the after race party is Tuesday . You don’t want to miss the ARP, I’ve done both Macs and the PH party puts the Chicago boys party to shame. It’s a great bonding time at a very beautiful place. My crew brings the spouses up and it is a true family time to remember. This should not be a hard sell. It gets in your blood, I’ve done about 25 macs. Wednesday to get to the venue then race Thursday, Friday Saturday, skip Sunday for travel. I could make this happen.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3010

    Chris
    Participant

    My raft is out of date but if we had a fleet on the Cove course I would get recertified.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3009

    Chris
    Participant

    I would change my plans for 2013 if other Olsons were in the PH Mac. I would just keep my boat in the marina between the two races(cheaply) and plan on doing both Ph races.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3008

    Chris
    Participant

    Another good distance race out of PHYC is the Huron 100 international. Sarnia yacht club co-sponsors it. It is the last weekend in June or first weekend in July. We have used it for years as a pre-Mac tune-up. It is 100 mile trapezoidal course in southern Huron. The crane and gin pole are free, except the PHYC harbor is closed the two days immediately prior to the Mac, so get in the weekend before the Mac or use the marina across the Black river $100.00 to put in. All that said we are doing both the Huron Challenge and the Chicago Mac for 2013.

    in reply to: 2013 NA’s site discussion #3005

    Chris
    Participant

    Correction, this years PH-Mac does not require life rafts for the shore course. Can use a PLB, cost about 300.00.

    in reply to: Spreaders #2944

    Chris
    Participant

    Lilya, Buzz made new spreaders for my spudcraft. He made an adapter bracket to connect his hollow spreaders to the spudcraft bracket. It’s totally different and I had to ship him my spreader so he could fabricate. Knowing Buzz he kept the design to help others such as yourself. I would consider upgrading to 3″ longer spreaders and moving the uppers to the top of the mast. Makes the boat much faster upwind when you can get the forestay taught.

    Chris Cyrul
    Opus Dei #85

    in reply to: Interesting handicap question #2863

    Chris
    Participant

    We have a full certificate. Our boat is heavy, so class trim is not accurate. I would not want to race a 3600 lbs California boat with my 4100 lbs. this is IRC weight which we weighed with a few extras then class ( but i believe our boat is heavy) Yes we sail symmetric , 155%, and a main slightly smaller then the Ullman class main that came with the boat. If we sail the Chicago Mac regularly we would go with the larger main(mostly downwind). Ours is six inches smaller at fifty percent. It gives us a thousandth less on the rating and clears the backstay ever time.

    in reply to: Interesting handicap question #2860

    Chris
    Participant

    IRC seemed fair to us. We had just one nemesis, a C&C 35 Mach II. The boat was owned by the same family since purchased. It is maxd out in everyway and the two sons are long time match racing sailors. It’s one of the best sailed boats in the race. We owed them about ten minutes in a sixty hour race, and in three tries were unsuccessful. On the fourth try they were not present and we won our class.

    in reply to: Jock Strap Physics #2735

    Chris
    Participant

    Hmmm. My doghouse/coachroof is a stepped configuration with paper thin glass that I can depress with my finger and likely kick a hole through. How does this flimsy piece of glass resist perpendicular loads athwartship. I’m not an engineer but the argument that the deck resists water, let alone the compressive loads of the rig under tension, is weak at best. The deck is similar to a trampoline on the Olsons I have stepped on. How this would replace a BOD eludes me.

    Remember the rig loads are carried fore and aft, also. The bow and arrow is fore and aft. We raced Cal 25 ‘s in the seventies and the way we knew the backstay was tight enough is when the rudder bound up and wouldn’t turn then we backed off ever so slightly. If you can suspend the side stay rig loads on the Olson and not compress into the hull at the mast step, it seems to me that the hull would avoid the fore aft bow and arrow effect and carry the forestay load better. To better carry the forestay load is the reason for the longitudinal bulkheads, approved, spanning the cabinets and v-berth. I see this as the benefit of the jockstrap. The benefit being to deminish the fore and aft bow and arrow effect. I won’t be sailing without one.

    in reply to: Roller Furler’s #2625

    Chris
    Participant

    Tom, I have run bare coax for six years with out any problem. We run a separate 24gauge wire also for the masthead fly light for distance racing. We taped the two wires together at 2 foot intervals with a quick double wrap of electrical tape. This hasn’t snagged anything yet. The hole in the front of the mast at the partners is a big problem. It is a source of mast failures. We spliced a three foot 1/4” aluminum “splint” if you will(about 1.5 feet above and below the partners, do to the stress cracking that began to occur at this location. It wraps aroud almost to the luff track. We riveted it in place. It limits lower mast bend but better than a failure. It also limits fore and aft movement or the need to chock the mast at the partners. I believe you have the Sparcraft mast, as do I. If my memory serves me right these were the only masts with that fore facing hole at the partners. Inspect it carefully for cracking before you crank on the backstay.

    in reply to: Single Spreader Question #2624

    Chris
    Participant

    I have a Sparcraft mast and made such modifications. I went out 3″ per spreader. Don’t consider raising the capshrouds unless you increase the spreader length. I went as high as possible to offset backstay tension induced lateral bending. I ordered appropriate length rod. The result was great. Six years later no problems. Yhe boat has been through five MAC’s with high winds and large seas beating for 20 hours at a time. These parameters were not mine but a recommendation from Chuck Queen long time Olson 30 owner and previous Ullman sails rep.

    in reply to: Fore hatch spinnaker bag #2525

    Chris
    Participant

    My 2 cents. I use an over sized light weight nylon bag (Home made), with fore and aft 4 ft battens to retain shape. It is attached with 4 piston hanks to plastic wire leads mounted to the four corners of hatch. Won’t crunch chute as Al said, won’t hook on motor as old school mentioned. The hanks make easy removal if LD racing and need to stuff sails in or out of front hatch.
    A great idea for WL racing, from Jack-a Roe, is the “OOOO Shit line”. We have a shackle mounted approx five feet from the bow on the port toe rail. A line runs from the trigger diagonally to the starboard toe rail just aft of the front hatch. The spin halyard goes into the schackle(under and outside the jib on starboard tack), and stays attached to the chute. Everyone stays on the rail until we round the windward mark, then we call for “OOOO Shit”. The bowman trips (ooo Shit line) the halyard schackle, from windward rail and the hoist begins also from the rail(ratchet block on deck at mast base for spin halyard, halyard pulls thru mast mounted cleat). By the time we hit offset we have a full chute, jib down and no one has left the rail to free halyard from behind spreaders.
    No, it doesn’t interfere with the jib, yes it is windage.

    in reply to: New Running Rigging #2465

    Chris
    Participant

    I decided to replace my 1/4″ blended polypro/vectran core sheets after this years Chi-Mac. They held up to about 35 before we got the chute down. I just went with 1/4″ 6mm Paraloc Shark. 4200 break strength. Vectran core with non abrading technora cover. I plan to leave cover on(it is integral can’t be removed, won’t slide or stretch) and use for light medium and heavy. I tie on sheets therefore able to rotate so there isn’t any distinct wear patterns weak points. Buy long and cut 6″ off each end after a few seasons. This will remove the wear point in the jaws of the pole. This would also make a great 1/4″ halyard. I rotate my halyards end for end also(luggage tag both ends)

    in reply to: Spin Pole boom Bag #2415

    Chris
    Participant

    What a great informative group we have. It loos like I will have to get out of the stone age and add a boom bag.

    Chris

    in reply to: Spin Pole boom Bag #2405

    Chris
    Participant

    Old School do you have a “rodeo” pole? It seems as though the bridles would make a tangled mess trying to get in and out of the bag. Do you have to adjust the topping lift and downhaul with each set or do you just blow both and the foredeck shoves it into the bag?

    If I remember right Chuck said the bag was visually disturbing and the constant banging upwind was also a distraction. He did make the comment that the crew liked it better.

    in reply to: Spin Pole boom Bag #2401

    Chris
    Participant

    Jim I don’t have any specs but would like to add to this string. When I first bought Opus Dei I consulted with Chuck Queen, and he sailed both ways with and without the boombag. I took him at face value when he said he would rather sail without it. Does anyone have pros and cons? It seems also that a Forte “rodeo” style pole(no bridles, D-rings lashed to center of pole, would work best with this set up. Any thoughts?

Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)