Bruce Hubble

 

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Viewing 30 posts - 31 through 60 (of 381 total)
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  • in reply to: Cockpit Drains #3658
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Stern waves are zero problem.

    Cockpit could fill during pitchpole maneuvers :) and total knockdowns. How long it takes to drain is the real issue.

    You could consider enlarging the starboard drain if you don’t mind the asymmetric look. A soft flapper over the end would prevent backwash. Rather than do this…have a two gallon bucket handy.

    I opened my stern (custom cockpit) and following seas in a blow with everyone in the back will bring in (wave hits) maybe a 1/4″ of water on a rare wave hit. Needless to say, it drains immediately. You should not worry at all about stern waves.

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3619
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    I really, really like endurabraid for spin and genoa sheets. I uncover 50% of spin sheets using 5/16th (8mm) for size. The uncovered, coated dyneema is waterproof and very, very light. We don’t carry light air sheets.

    I use that size for handling, not strength. I’m thinking of two new spin halyards and probably will get endurabraid 6mm and strip those!

    Don’t forget that you can have high tech for 1/2 of halyards and 1/2 low tech! Save some bucks!

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3618
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    I’m beginning to believe some masts have different exit setups. I have a centerline sheave that is below two upper side by side spinnaker exits. The lower exit is for the jib as the other two are above the forestay.

    Vectran and Dyneema have very comparable strengths. Creep is not really stretch. It is the ‘setting’ of the fibers during first usage. Vectran is known to not creep much. Dyneema creeps a bunch, unless you get the heat set version. Creep is NOT a factor for adjusted lines. It is a factor for rigging that is static. A backstay will lengthen on you if dyneema. You need to know the creep and make an allowance for it. Once it sets..good as gold! I really like the heat treated single braid from New England. $2.05 a foot from Defender for 3/16″. 9400 lbs! Very little creep.

    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Also, the strength is suspect.

    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Not so sure those are original. Those don’t have enough purchase to trim the main properly! My opinion!

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3611
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    yep..a 31 ft main.

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3609
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Do both in vectran.

    2:1 main? Why? I put a stopper in the rope groove at the white band. We hoist to that and we are done. We use a free tack with a line around the boom to tack it. (Quantum did this) The Cunningham does the rest. Main should be vectran as well.

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3607
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    6mm line is max needed, btw. Dyneema blend a core minimum.

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3606
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    You can hoist a genoa on either spin halyard. Just make sure it is as high tech a line as the jib halyard.

    The buoy races we do round to port, so we use the port halyard the most, hoisting from the ‘high side’. On distance races, if you want to change jibs, use the starboard halyard and make sure it is the high tech one. This leaves the ‘hoisting’ side free for the spinnaker. We cleat both spinnakers on the mast. The jib goes through a clutch near the cabin top winch and has a jam cleat as well for higher wind/tension.

    side note: On distance races, we have abandoned spinnaker peels. We can douse and launch faster.

    in reply to: Halyard Replacement #3604
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Two spinnakers. We have the port spinnaker halyard exit the mast on starboard for hoisting. Is that what you are asking? We cleat it on the mast. Fairlead above the cleat.

    in reply to: Length of Rod Backstay #3600
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Get rid of the rod now. Make the rope any length you want. I’m using the heat set dyneema that will boost the strength from amsteel blue 5800 lbs to 9300 lbs using 3/16″. It doesn’t have the initial creep you get with a ‘new’ installation of regular amsteel. I make my backstay only long enough so that I can reach the block from the cabin top at face level or a bit higher. No geometry needed. Spend 30 minutes making eyes (with SS thimbles) $75 bucks now vs later…do it now is the time to do it.

    New England Ropes STS – HSR 75 Silver Dyneema Rope

    •Diameter: 3/16″ (5mm), Tensile Strength: 9300 lbs, Color: Gray

    •Material: 100% HMPE Dyneema 75 Fiber, Heat Treated Under Tension

    •Replacement for Lifelines and Selected Standing Rigging, Sold per Foot

    $2.00 a foot is normal price.

    Will weigh less than a pound! Weigh that rod!

    in reply to: Rudder Bearings #3592
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Before grinding the bottom bearing off, make sure your rudder clears the bottom. You may need to take some of the top bearing off!

    in reply to: Rudder Bearings #3591
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    I would think so! They are the ‘bearing’ for the rudder head. Make sure you pounded that lower bearing in all the way.

    in reply to: 2015 North American Championship Site Selection #3589
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Chance of chartering a boat in NJ? I can bring my own sails.

    in reply to: Port Huron to Mackinac 2015 #3587
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Registration is open for the Bayview to Mackinac 2015 Race: http://www.bycmack.com/main_documents.cfm

    Spar Wars is in!

    in reply to: Port Huron to Mackinac 2015 #3573
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Please post if you have ANY interest! It is not too early to plan!

    in reply to: 2015 schedule #3570
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Midwest boats should consider the Port Huron to Mackinac. Spar Wars and Opus Dei are in for sure. Couple of others are interested! Do it…mid July. Launch in Port Huron and have your pit crew meet you in Mackinaw City for haul out and return.

    PHRF Shore Course. You will need as a minimum Offshore #2 equipment. Read the NOR early to make sure you have the stuff!

    in reply to: Rudder Bearings #3568
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    If you were banging the bottom from ‘floating’..you need the 1/4″ to prevent that. Add shims (plastic washers) under your tiller mount to shim ‘up’ the rudder. You should have very little up and down. (annoying!) Performance…1/4″? Nope, especially when you consider a windward tiller angle is a few degrees to weather anyway.

    in reply to: Overboard Pole #3567
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    They make a MOB pole for stern tubes. I have one..it fits. I think it is a Jim Buoy. Search with stern tube.

    in reply to: Rudder Bearings #3556
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Ray, just to be clear, you don’t want it to bind to the rudder shaft. You want it to move with just a bit of resistance. You want the bearing to bind in the hull and rudder top tube and not move at all.

    I don’t think ‘swelling’ is an issue I have ever heard of. My new bearing from Pride slipped over the shaft and with a block I got the lower one over the middle fat part of the shaft. Once it got to normal position, all was fine. Slight resistance: move with fingers with just a mild grip.

    Hard to explain any better. Why did you add to the shaft? remind me.

    in reply to: RIP Old School #3550
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    I know someone who needs a boom and gooseneck.

    If you find it please post the info for all.

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3549
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Let us know what you figure out.

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3547
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Don’t take this wrong, but you seem to be chasing which HCP system has an advantage to an Olson? That is where my comments are coming from.

    Or are you deciding what kind of boats you want to race against? I guess that would be subject to the entries you see.

    If you are just starting out, you should prepare for a two year learning curve more. :)

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3545
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Elaborate:

    IRC/ORR and others in history have tried to impress upon racers that ‘only their system’ works and PHRF is for the commoner. Most of those sophisticated rating systems were measurement systems and encouraged ‘design’ features that were horrific or attempted to make all previous boats obsolete. The current rules seem to punish stepping outside the norm of a cruiser/racer as they designate. However, those designs are making a joke of the cruiser/racer that we know. It is no wonder that these ‘jokes’ are in the PHRF fleets.

    PHRF is a ‘one number’ rule. So is IRC. ORR attempts to massage their ‘number’ via the race course design. However, the number is typically wrong as the course cannot always be predicted.

    PHRF, using TOT factors, is the absolute best system. It takes all comers regardless of design. You can’t design a PHRF boat. You can have a well performing boat in all wind ranges….that is what is known as a phrf killer. The Olson is not one of those boats. It is great in light; sticky in mid range; and very fast in heavy. This is not the boat, it is the averaging effect of getting a fair ‘one number’.

    Chasing a handicap system to fit a boat is a lesson in futility. Race the boat hard and expect results. One shift is worth a ton of handicap.

    Race what you like as far as handicap. I just hate to see wasted money on these measurement rules that have no better system than PHRF.

    Stepping off soap box…..

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3540
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Support PHRF. IRC is a measurement rule. You will have a great initial expense with measurement/weighing, etc. Think $1000. Plus the certificate cost more than PHRF.

    Remember, you will probably only encounter IRC a couple of times a year. Unless sailing one design, PHRF will be your mixed fleet of choice.

    IRC may seem more sophisticated, but it is truly a one number rule like PHRF.

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3538
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Stick with PHRF for now. IRC is expensive…buy a sail instead!

    I’m not sure about IRC and stability rules. ORR does have stability rules and the Olson is on the brink of qualifying for near shore events. Offshore..forget it.

    Spar Wars is definitely doing the Port Huron/Mac. Opus Dei is pretty committed as well. Port Huron to Mac is DRYA PHRF.

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3523
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    forgot to add: Read the definition of “rule” (d)

    in reply to: Olson 30 PHRF or IRC? #3522
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Two cents on the subject:

    I am an area handicapper for Lake Michigan PHRF. I’ve done some pretty extensive research into the rules about certificates and have come to the decision that certificates are MANDATORY when the handicap/scoring is itemized in the NOR. A handicap system is a class rule. As such, no OA or Club has the right to change the class rules. Can you imagine an IRC or ORR event that would make it optional? Why then is PHRF exempted? Rule 78.1, 78.2, 86.1(c) are just a few that apply.

    As a racer sailor, I want to know my competition has signed a certificate that they are racing in compliance with the area PHRF rule, that the equipment is on board, that the sails are legal for the rating and that fair sailing is enforced in this way.

    Done!

    in reply to: New Owner #108 #3521
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    I trailer to Port Huron. I live in N Michigan, so my return delivery is only 50 miles to next regatta in Harbor Springs. You could trailer from Mackinaw City back home if you have a delivery driver. Otherwise…just a great sail back!

    in reply to: New Owner #108 #3519
    Bruce Hubble
    Bruce Hubble
    Participant

    Mast holes are below deck level. If you have one on the front side, consider having it welded shut. Cracks have been known to start there. Be aware is my message.

    My mast is a replacement and has a hole on each side down below. Wiring exits. I only have a steaming light and the masthead light now. Using a tack tick wireless wind direction/speed instrument.

Viewing 30 posts - 31 through 60 (of 381 total)